Soy mujer. Y un entrañable calor me abriga cuando el mundo me golpea. Es el calor de las otras mujeres, de aquellas que hicieron de la vida este rincón sensible, luchador, de piel suave y tierno corazón guerrero". Alejandra Pizarnik, argentina, poeta y escritora.

Soy mujer. Y un entrañable calor me abriga cuando el mundo me golpea. Es el calor de las otras mujeres, de aquellas que hicieron de la vida este rincón sensible, luchador, de piel suave y tierno corazón guerrero". Alejandra Pizarnik, argentina, poeta y escritora.

Soy mujer. Y un entrañable calor me abriga cuando el mundo me golpea. Es el calor de las otras mujeres, de aquellas que hicieron de la vida este rincón sensible, luchador, de piel suave y tierno corazón guerrero". Alejandra Pizarnik, argentina, poeta y escritora.

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Anit Conducts First Study About Transgender People in Managua

 

The study focused on learning more about transgender perspectives about the context in
the capital of Nicaragua.

In September, the Nicaraguan Association of Transgender People (ANIT) will publish the
first study about the context of transgender people that live in Managua, the capital of
Nicaragua. The study brings together data about the conditions they face for work, health,
housing, family relationships, sexual and reproductive health, violence, and human rights.
The study is based on a survey of 202 transgender people, 21 of whom are transgender
men. ANIT survey promoters visited the municipalities of Tipitapa, Ciudad Sandino, and
the districts that make up Managua.

One key result of the study was a lack of understanding on the part of trans people about
their human rights. The study revealed a lack of awareness about the types of violence
and discrimination that they are exposed to daily, as well as a lack of interest on the part of
health and educational institutions to respect the identity of transgender women and men.
ANIT plans for this study conducted in Managua to serve as the basis for a broader
national study.

The Central American Women’s Fund (FCAM) spoke with members of ANIT, who shared
more about a few of the findings of the study titled, “Situational study of transgender
people in Nicaragua.”

“The majority of transgender people are not aware of the laws and there are many
contradictions in what they do know about: they say that they do not receive discrimination
on the part of their families, that they are doing well, that it is just the way that they live.
However, when answering another question later in the survey, they would say that the
people who attack them are their own family members,” said Ludwika Vega, an ANIT
Coordinator.

It’s concerning for ANIT that violence has become normalized by transgender people.
They see it as something commonplace. Some of them laughed as they talked about a
situation in which they were beat up or they experienced poor treatment. “Many of the
transgender people surveyed see it as normal to have other people shout profanity at them
in the street,” added Samy Sandoval, an ANIT member.

Other important findings of the study included that that majority of transgender people do
not have access to education because of a lack on money or because of discrimination
from other students and teachers.

“Transgender people do not go to school because the educational system does not let
them…even though there are scholarships, there are still costs to cover books, notebooks,
transportation, etc. Most do not have the money and so they stop going to school. There
are only a few that achieve a university level education. We must also add in the
discrimination from teachers,” Vega points out.

The need for a law related to gender identity is another one of the important conclusions of
the study. “There is an urgent need,” the transgender members agree. A legal framework
on the matter would help to reduce discrimination, since transgender people would be
legally recognized by their social name as transgender people. “This would mean
increased access and visibility which would improve their living conditions,” ANIT affirms.

The study was conducted in three different stages. First, the survey was validated through
input from different transgender women leaders during a meeting in which they provided
feedback on the questions. Then the questions were reviewed during the second stage by
the ANIT staff.

During the third stage, ANIT members received training on survey methods and learned
how to use the computer program SPSS to process the data collected.

“The most important thing about performing this study for the group was to better
understand how transgender people perceive the situation in which they live,” ANIT’s
Coordinator pointed out.

At the moment, the study is in the final phase: writing up the findings in order to share
them with the public and publish them by the end of September.
Get to know more about ANIT: http://bit.ly/2cVOXDZ